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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
with a friend with a k-47. he was a key power broker in the fight with the taliban. we're live from kabul. it's tuesday, july 12th. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. we start with the deadlock. this afternoon the two sides are farther apart than they've ever been. they were farther apart yesterday when -- then they were even sunday and farther apart sunday then they were thursday. the question is whether the daily meetings are going to continue. the president said he's shooting for the biggest possible deal and asking if not now, when. listen. >> we think it's hard now. imagine how these guys are going to be thinking six months from now in the middle of election season when they are all up. it's not going to get easier, it's going to get harder. we might as well do it now. pull off the band-aid. eat our peas. >> also in the room, eric cantor laid out what was agreed to in the biden talks, which is about $1.5 trillion in cuts, still nearly a trillion dollars short of the amount required to finance a debt deal through 2012. republicans said it needs to be dollar for dollar. the
released by taliban showing 16 men being executed. >> this is a graphic look at how brutal and ugly the war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you would like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. men wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men, you assume these are taliban fighters. one of them is scolding the men who are lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying these executions are about to take place for six children. the military here vehemently denies those excuses took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. you see the men topple to the ground, some of them moaning and writhing in pain. we're not going so show you what happened next. some of the gunmen walk up to the men and shoot them again, sometimes in an effort too make sure they're dead. the military believes the men who were killed were police officers kidnapped du
in a surge of taliban violence increasingly targeting afghan politicians and civili civilians. seth doane reports. >> reporter: it was two years ago fausia kufa wrote this troubling message to her daughters. >> reporter: maybe today is the day i will die. >> reporter: her published farewell letter was written because as an outspoken member of parliament in afghanistan, kufi is a target of the taliban. >> right now i think the terrorist acts are the biggest threat for me and for others. for me more because i talk against them. >> reporter: her father was assassinated as were three of her brothers. you're willing to die for your job, for this country? >> we will die one day. i think the pride will be if you die paving the way for others, we're leaving something behind. if i'm afraid i will die and i don't do anything, who will take this country? >> reporter: targeted killings in afghanistan are up more than 100% since 2009, according to the united nations. is anyone safe in afghanistan, really safe? >> well, not. we can't say that anyone is safe in this country. >> reporter: haroon mir runs
in afghanistan. they also have the pakistani taliban attacking them. we're also the point of a new low in u.s.-pakistani relations. so the idea that pakistan would instigate a crisis with india at this point is inconceivable to me. >> what about indian intelligence-gathering and a security? there have been a number of threats, particularly since 2008. is this any reflection on the indian authorities competence in this area? >> there will be questioned about another attack in mumbai. again, four attacks in the last 10 years. after 2008, there were major reviews within india about internal security, and in this case, there will be a very close examination of how quickly india responded. they have their national security guard deployed there. they have friends a unit on the scene. they need to hopefully -- they have forensic units on the scene. they need to hopefully see having that experience corrected in that beleaguered city. >> in other news, police and venezuela have regained control of a prison east of the capital after a standoff that lasted for 27 days. more than 800 inmates have not g
rough. the coalition troops and the taliban moved on foot. the coalition also has helicopters that can get them between mountain tops. they would be back to walking around on foot. these are law that useful. -- a lot less useful. they are used for blowing up vehicles. in some places, you see more small arms. this sort of looks like a world war ii street battle on a smaller scale. guys running around with rifles and tossing grenades, things like that. on the coalition side, there is a significant air power aspect of it as well. the tactical security threats to nato troops. >> this is located in the far most peace which is a ride along the border. this is a critical area for cross border infiltration as well as a historic avenue and the movement of supplies. >> in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how would you characterize this? >> i would characterize this as high as venture. there is a significant influx of insurgent fighters to the area. >> we are prepared to go on a mission, tell me about that and what it is for. >> this is a standard reconnaissance mission. we're going in there to
the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's northwest in tribal areas. he also admits there was some skepticism about what help they are getting from pakistan after they killed osama bin laden last month. he did say that in the past pakistan has helped them track down some of the al-qaeda leadership. >> heather: thank you very much, david piper streaming live from afghanistan. >> gregg: are we really in reach of defeating al-qaeda? is the road to victory as simply as taking out the top 20 leaders. joining me now is senior advisor and principal of international advis
. >> general, chuck hoss kinson from politico. you said before that with the problem of infiltration of taliban into afghan security forces, as the afghans take over more and more responsibility that there might be a need to accept a greater risk in terms of dealing with that problem. how would you assess the possibility of that risk going forward now and what steps would you be taking to mitigate it? >> the mitigation of that risk is being done by a combination of counterintelligence effort, by the coalition forces and most importantly the afghan national security forces are taking it head on. it's an issue of leadership and knowing your people and the afghan leadership and chain of command is taking that on and i believe we're moving in the right direction with that risk. >> i want to thing che -- change the subject real quick work the upcoming transition in the army, i was wondering if you could talk a little bit about your interactions with general odeer noah and your thoughts on his leadership for the army going forward. >> i've had just one interact with general odierno at a utility confe
the taliban to peace talks when the u.s. forces drawdown. it's key to keep the pressure up to give the country a chance of some kind of reconciliation. and speaking in kandahar, he said the focus of the trip is the handover of security to afghan forces but he acknowledged there remain, quote, a lot more work to do in materials of being able to transition the responsibility to them. afghan forces now number around 300,000 but very few of their units can act independently. back to you, gregg. >> gregg: david piper, thank you. >> heather: space shuttle atlantis linking up with the international space station important the last time. the final dock go to the orbital out post by a shuttle. it will retire after the flight. the last of the 30-year shuttle program. on its final journey, they arrived bearing gifts, four tons of supplies including clothing and food. >> america's brush with royalty coming to a close, duke and duchess wrapping up a tour in southern california. one of their final stops skid row arts school for kids of all ages. casey stegall is live in los angeles with more. explain the pu
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)